Archive for April, 2009

News you can use — for your leisure time

April 30th, 2009
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Pops: Something for everyone

The Honolulu Symphony’s pops season next year will feature Glenn Campbell, original Supremes member Mary Wilson, stage and film star Ben Vereen, and local faves Jimmy Borges and Kaumakaiwa Kanaka’ole.
The Toyota Pops season, conducted by maestro Matt Catingub at Blaisdell Concert Hall, thus offers a rainbow of music and something for everyone — from “Rhinestone Cowboy” to “Pippin,” from “Baby Love” to memory-makers from the Frank Sinatra songbook. Plus there will be Hawaiiana aplenty, including ki ho’alu, and fabled songs from The Beatles.
The lineup:
• Ben Vereen, Broadway legend, at 8 p.m. Oct. 23 and 24. Vereen has appeared in “Wicked,” “Fosse,” “Hair,” “Jesus Christ Supertsar,” and “Pippin,” and is known for his roles as Chicken George in “Roots” and Satchmo in “Louis Armstrong — Chicago Style.”
•“Abbey Road,” at 8 p.m. Nov. 13 and 14. This evening celebrates the 40th anniversary of The Beatles’ legendary album, encompassing such hits as “Come Together,” “Something,” “Octopus’ Garden” and “Here Comes the Sun.”
• Glenn Campbell, at 8 pm. Dec. 11 and 12. With a Holiday Pops theme, there will be some Christmas elements but Campbell’s chartbusters will be the draw — “Gentle on My Mind,” “By the Time I Get to Phoenix,” and “Wichita Lineman.”
• Melody Gardot, at 8 p.m. Jan. 8 and 9. Gardot, a singer-songwriter in the jazz-blues vein, makes her Honolulu debut with classic blues, pop, jazz and folk in the Ella Fitzgerald, Billie Holliday and Nina Simone mold.
• Mary Wilson of The Supremes, at 8 p.m. March 26 and 27. Wilson is one of the founding members of the girl group linked with Diana Ross and the Motown sound. Get ready for "Baby Love" and "I Hear a Symphony."
•Kaumakaiwa Kanaka’ole, a voice of Hawaii’s new generation of prolific performers, at 8 p.m. April 16 and 17. In a concert themed “A’iwa’iwa,” expect the Na Hoku Hanohano Award winner and ‘olapa of Halau O Kekuhi to share his music fused in his Island heritage; Kanaka’ole comes from an ‘ohana with deep roots in hula, chant and the ‘aina. With slack key masters Jeff Peterson, Cyril Pahinui and Dennis Kamakahi.
• Jimmy Borges, at 8 p.m. April 30 and May 10. Borges sings the music of Frank Sinatra, and is known to his fans as “the keeper of the flame,” since he keeps the legend of O’l Blue Eyes alive.
Season tickets are on sale now to the general public. Call 792‐2000 (weekdays) or 524‐0815 ext. 245 (evenings).

Dance: Ballet springs into action

The Hawaii State Ballet’s Spring Performance, mounted by artistic directors John Landovsky and Gina Surles, will be at 2 and 6 p.m. May 9 at Mamiya Theatre, Saint Louis High School.
The performance will showcase the talents of nearly every dancer in the school, ranging in age from 3 years to adult.
Dancers aged 3 to adult will perform Landovsky’s “Serenade,” with music by Tchaikovsky, performed by the advanced class, and “La Favorita, with music by Donizetti, will be danced by the junior IV class.
Tickets are $20, available at the door an hour prior to curtain time.
Landovsky founded Hawaii State Ballet 1983 with a goal to develop well-trained dancers, both technically and artistically, who are able to compare with dancers internationally. His former students have excelled in the ballet community nationally and internationally.

Party: Longhi’s marks 6th anniversary

Longhi’s at Ala Moana Center will mark its sixth anniversary with music, dancing and Italian-style pizza all night on Funkaholic Friday May 8.
Musicians will uncork funky music, said Charlie Longhi. Drink specials and no cover charge will also be on the agenda.

Eat: Pre-fixe at Chai’s includes book

Island chef Chai Chaowasaree of Chai’s Island Bistro and Singha Thai restaurants has turned author. With music as part of his mix at his Aloha Tower Marketplace eatery, he’s doing some added-value marketing, starting tomorrow (May 1). Buy a pre-fixe dinner, get his Island Bistro Cookbook valued at $32.50 in stores.
The special menu includes five signature courses from Chai’s cookbook, from appetizer to dessert, for $55. A party of two ordering the special receives the cookbook.
The deal includes a combo appetizer platter, corn chowder with Okinawan sweet potato, a duck breast carpaccio salad, a Sterling Silver beef tenderloin Wellington and a crème brulee sampler.
Reservations: 585-0011.

Pops: Something for everyone

The Honolulu Symphony’s pops season next year will feature Glenn Campbell, original Supremes member Mary Wilson, stage and film star Ben Vereen, and local faves Jimmy Borges and Kaumakaiwa Kanaka’ole.
The Toyota Pops season, conducted by maestro Matt Catingub at Blaisdell Concert Hall, thus offers a rainbow of music and something for everyone — from “Rhinestone Cowboy” to “Pippin,” from “Baby Love” to memory-makers from the Frank Sinatra songbook. Plus there will be Hawaiiana aplenty, including ki ho’alu, and fabled songs from The Beatles.
The lineup:
• Ben Vereen, Broadway legend, at 8 p.m. Oct. 23 and 24. Vereen has appeared in “Wicked,” “Fosse,” “Hair,” “Jesus Christ Supertsar,” and “Pippin,” and is known for his roles as Chicken George in “Roots” and Satchmo in “Louis Armstrong — Chicago Style.”
•“Abbey Road,” at 8 p.m. Nov. 13 and 14. This evening celebrates the 40th anniversary of The Beatles’ legendary album, encompassing such hits as “Come Together,” “Something,” “Octopus’ Garden” and “Here Comes the Sun.”
• Glenn Campbell, at 8 pm. Dec. 11 and 12. With a Holiday Pops theme, there will be some Christmas elements but Campbell’s chartbusters will be the draw — “Gentle on My Mind,” “By the Time I Get to Phoenix,” and “Wichita Lineman.”
• Melody Gardot, at 8 p.m. Jan. 8 and 9. Gardot, a singer-songwriter in the jazz-blues vein, makes her Honolulu debut with classic blues, pop, jazz and folk in the Ella Fitzgerald, Billie Holliday and Nina Simone mold.
• Mary Wilson of The Supremes, at 8 p.m. March 26 and 27. Wilson is one of the founding members of the girl group linked with Diana Ross and the Motown sound. Get ready for "Baby Love" and "I Hear a Symphony."
•Kaumakaiwa Kanaka’ole, a voice of Hawaii’s new generation of prolific performers, at 8 p.m. April 16 and 17. In a concert themed “A’iwa’iwa,” expect the Na Hoku Hanohano Award winner and ‘olapa of Halau O Kekuhi to share his music fused in his Island heritage; Kanaka’ole comes from an ‘ohana with deep roots in hula, chant and the ‘aina. With slack key masters Jeff Peterson, Cyril Pahinui and Dennis Kamakahi.
• Jimmy Borges, at 8 p.m. April 30 and May 10. Borges sings the music of Frank Sinatra, and is known to his fans as “the keeper of the flame,” since he keeps the legend of O’l Blue Eyes alive.
Season tickets are on sale now to the general public. Call 792‐2000 (weekdays) or 524‐0815 ext. 245 (evenings).

Dance: Ballet springs into action

The Hawaii State Ballet’s Spring Performance, mounted by artistic directors John Landovsky and Gina Surles, will be at 2 and 6 p.m. May 9 at Mamiya Theatre, Saint Louis High School.
The performance will showcase the talents of nearly every dancer in the school, ranging in age from 3 years to adult.
Dancers aged 3 to adult will perform Landovsky’s “Serenade,” with music by Tchaikovsky, performed by the advanced class, and “La Favorita, with music by Donizetti, will be danced by the junior IV class.
Tickets are $20, available at the door an hour prior to curtain time.
Landovsky founded Hawaii State Ballet 1983 with a goal to develop well-trained dancers, both technically and artistically, who are able to compare with dancers internationally. His former students have excelled in the ballet community nationally and internationally.

Party: Longhi’s marks 6th anniversary
Longhi’s at Ala Moana Center will mark its sixth anniversary with music, dancing and Italian-style pizza all night on Funkaholic Friday May 8.
Musicians will uncork funky music, said Charlie Longhi. Drink specials and no cover charge will also be on the agenda.

Eat: Pre-fixe at Chai’s includes book

Island chef Chai Chaowasaree of Chai’s Island Bistro and Singha Thai restaurants has turned author. With music as part of his mix at his Aloha Tower Marketplace eatery, he’s doing some added-value marketing, starting tomorrow (May 1). Buy a pre-fixe dinner, get his Island Bistro Cookbook valued at $32.50 in stores.
The special menu includes five signature courses from Chai’s cookbook, from appetizer to dessert, for $55. A party of two ordering the special receives the cookbook.
The deal includes a combo appetizer platter, corn chowder with Okinawan sweet potato, a duck breast carpaccio salad, a Sterling Silver beef tenderloin Wellington and a crème brulee sampler.
Reservations: 585-0011.

Celebrate: Lei Day in Honolulu
May Day is Lei Day in Honolulu — and the city’s 82nd Lei Day Celebration unfolds from 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. tomorrow (May 1) at the Kapi’olani Park Bandstand area.
For the second consecutive year, there is no longer the traditional Brothers Cazimero May Day concert nighttime at the Waikiki Shell. There is, however, a free daytime program at the bandstand.
The schedule:
• 9 to 10 a.m. — Royal Hawaiian Band.
• 10:15 a.m. to noon — Investiture ceremony for the 2009 Lei Queen and Court.
• Noon to 12:50 p.m. — Kapena.
• 1 to 1:50 p.m. — Na Wahine O KaHula Mai Ka Pu’uwai.
• 2 to 2:50 p.m. — Mana’o Company.
• 3 to 3:50 p.m. — Na Kupuna ‘O Ko’olau.
• 4 to 5:30 p.m. — Halau Hula ‘O Hokulani.
Also, the Hawaiian Steel Guitar Assn. will provide music from 1 to 4 p.m in the lei exhibit area between the bandstand and the shell.
Lei will be accepted for judging from 7:30 to 9 a.m., with judging from 10 a.m. to noon. Public viewing will be from 12:30 to 5:30 p.m.

Hot tips: reality show, Manoa theater

April 29th, 2009
By



Reece’s piece: modeling reality show

Kim Taylor Reece, award-winning photographer best known for his sepia- tone hula images, will launch a modeling reality show this summer on KITV4.
Reece will appear on the ABC affiliate tomorrow morning (April 30) to discuss the series, envisioned as an eight-week summer competition that will re-run for another eight weeks through mid-September.
Auditions will be held form 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. this Saturday (May 2) at the Kim Taylor Reece Gallery, at 1142 Bethel St. in Chinatown.
The show is searching for women aged 18 to 34; bring a headshot (3 by 5 inches) and portfolio. Modeling or hula kahiko experience is advantageous but not required.
Suggested wardrobe: casual, Hawaiian print attire, with heels or sandals (no slippers). Light make-up is OK, but no stage make-up.
Details: Karlel Crowley, editor of Look Hawaii Magazine, 371-5700.

MVT: Age of Aquarius, sleuthing, pidgin parody

Four musicals, including “Hair,” “Forbidden Broadway: Special Victims Unit” and “Winter Wonderlettes,” top Manoa Valley Theatre’s 2009-2010 season — the theater’s 41st year — beginning this fall.:
The slate:
* “Forbidden Broadway: Special Victims Unit,” Sept. 3 through 20. A musical revue by Gerard Alessandrini, off-Broadway’s kingin of send-ups and spoofs of mainstream shows. Directed by Elitei Tatafu. This edition includes parodies of “Jersey Boys,” “Mamma Mia,” “South Pacific,” “The Lion King” and “Wicked.” Show creator Allesandrini will again lend personal assistance, assuring a spot-on spoof.
* “Winter Wonderettes,” Nov. 12 through 29, a holiday musical by Roger Bean. Directed by Brett Harwood. The 1960s provide the backdrop to a holiday party for the soon-to-close Harper’s Hardware, and the score is rich with winterly wonderments like “Jingle Bell Rock,” “Santa Claus Is Coming to Town,” and yes, even “Mele Kalikimaka.”
* “The Dixie Swim Club,” Jan. 14 through 31, a comedy-drama by Jessie Jones, Nicholas Hope and Jamie Wooten. Directed by Betty Burdick. Five Southern women whose friendship dates back to their college swim team ear, go on an annual August weekend to recharge those roots; the play spans a 33-year period.
* “Hair,” March 4 through 21, an American tribal love-rock musical by James Rado, Gerome Ragni and Galt McDermot, currently in revival on Broadway. Directed by Rob Duval. It’s a 1968 flashback to the Age of Aquarius, with a dawn of such Top 40 hits as “Good Morning Starshine,” “Hair,” and “Let the Sunshine In,” amid anti-war and love-and-peace themes.
* “Sleuth,” May 20 through June 6, a thriller by Anthoy Shaffer. Director TBA. A mystery writer ensconced in an English manor lures his wife’s lover to his home and convinces him o stage a robbery of her gems for their mutual benefit, triggering a chain of events that test the audience’s ability to define where reality and fantasy begin and end in a game with murderous consequences.
* “Once Upon One Time,” July 8 through 25, an award-winning local-style musical comedy parody, by Lisa Matsumoto, Paul Palmore and Roslyn Catracchia. Directed by Bree Bumatai. This local fave combines pidgin with parody, as family fairy tales unwind with familiar characters and situations, cloaked with loco local lunacy: Noelani and da Six Menehunes, Red Rose Haku, Kekoa and Maile, and Da Keed Who Wen Cry Mongoose. It’s the first revival of a popular series by the late playwright Matsumoto. Mythic and manic fun-kine stuff.
Season tickes go on sale shortly.
Information: 988-6131.

Datebook doings: Watch, eat, listen, ride, enjoy

April 28th, 2009
By



Watch: Valentino, up close and personal

As a prelude to the Honolulu Rainbow Film Festival set for May 21 through 24, the Honolulu Gay & Lesbian Cultural Foundation will present “Valentino: The Last Emperor,” a documentary on designer Valentino Garavani, in a screening at 8 p.m. this Friday (May 1) at the Kahala Theatre.
“Valentino” is an intimate, even hilarious, fly-on-the-wall portrait of the legendary Italian designer and the dramatic closing act of his career and his 50-year relationship with his business and life partner, Giancarlo Giammetti.
Tickets: $20, includes the screening and a pair of Hula’s Bar & Lei Stand drink tickets. Hula’s is taking reservations. Information: 923-0669.
And: Oscar-winning screenwriter-producer Dustin Lance Black will make an appearance at the Rainbow filmfest "Gayla Celebration" finale, at 5 p.m. May 24, at the Henry Luce Pavilion at the Honolulu Academy of Arts. Black wrote and produced "Milk," the Oscar-winning film.

Listen: Sweet summer sounds by the sea

“Ke Kani O Ke Kai,” the summer concert series at the Waikiki Aquarium, again will assemble five top-notch acts for noctural serenades by the sea beginning June 18.
Concerts start at 7 p.m, doors open at 5:30 p.m., and attendance is limited to 550 reservations.
The schedule:
• June 18 — The Brothers Cazimero.
• July 2 — Hoku Zuttermeister.
• July 16 — Kaumakaiwa Kanakaole.
• July 30 — Maunalua.
• Aug. 13 — Willie K.
Tickets: $25 adults, $10 youths 7 through 12, free for keiki 6 and under; $18 and $7 for Friends of Waikiki Aquarium; series tickets, $90 ($75 for FOWA). Call 550-8847 or go to www.honoluluboxoffice.com; available at the Aquarim box office starting May 4.

Eat: A chance to max out on cheese

Say “cheese.”
Restaurateur Ed Wary, owner of Auntie Pasto’s restaurant, will stage a Cheesefest May 4 through 31 at his Italian eatery at 1099 Beretania St. at the corner of Pensacola.
“Where would Italian food be without cheese?” says Wary, who will make his own cheeses and showcase a cheese-inspired menu.
For lunch, there will be a budget-conscious grilled cheese with tomato soup for $8, meatball sliders covered in melted mozzarella and provolone cheese with side sala for $7.50.
Daily entrees will include whole wheat pasta with myzithra cheese, spinach and sun dried tomatoes; and homemade fettuccine in a creamy gorgonzola sauce with peas and tomatoes.
After 5 p.m., there will be daily specials: Monday, Cheeseburger meatloaf with ricotta mashers and gravy; Tuesday, prosciutto and cheese-stuffed shells over spinach topped with a creamy Asiago sauce; Wednesday; cavatelli, ricotta dumplings with turkey sausage, tomato, extra virgin olive oil and parmesano reggiano; Thursday, baked macaroni cheese with chicken and broccoli; Friday, nana’s stuffed shrimp with three-cheese risotto; Saturday, lamb shanks with oranges, olives and feta cheese; and Sunday, Italian flag chicken, cheese-stuffed with oven roasted tomato with angel hair pasto.
Even dessert has cheese, like cheesecake with flavors, and strawberry tiramisu with mascarpone cheese.
Information: 523-8855.

Walk: A trek on Mother’s Day

A mile-long walk through a Manoa neighborhood known as Pu‘u Pueo (Owl’s Hill) will be held form 8:30 a.m. to noon on Mother’s Day (May 10).
Malama O Manoa is presenting the activity to mark National Historic Preservation Month.
Rain or shine, you’ll hear legends of spirits, owl ‘aumakua and menehune battles, linked to the historic zone. You’ll see more than 20 significant homes, many designed by Territorial-era architects like
Hart Wood, Mark Potter, Robert G. Miller,Miles Gray and Emory & Webb.
Six sites on the Hawaii State Register of Historic Places,m eight homes will be open for viewing.
Park at Manoa Valley District Park’s upper lot, off Manoa Road; a shuttle will operate fro 8:30 to 10:30 a.m., with half-hour runs to the registration tent to start the tour. Houses will close promptly at noon.
Register by May 4 with your name, address, phone number and a $25 check payable to Malama O Manoa, P.O. Box 61961, Honolulu HI 96839. After May 4, admission will be $30. Walk-up registration will be available, space permitting. Tickets will not be mailed; confirmations at the sign-up.
Information: Linda LeGrande at 947-7400 or email:
mohalaway@hawaii.rr.com. Registration forms are also available at most Manoa merchants.

Dance: Big band era music on tap

Miles Jackson, veteran jazz musician, takes the limelight to provide music from the big band era for “Moonlight Magic,” a Hawai‘i Theatre fundraiser set for May 9 at the Kahala Hotel & Resort.
Local swing dance clubbers will help entice guests to the dance floor.
To reserve a table, call 791-1302.

Enjoy: Big Bros and Sis’ ‘60s fundraiser

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Honolulu will stage a 1960s-themed “Imagine” fundraiser at – p.m. May 9 at the Hawai ‘i Convention Center’s rooftop garden and ballroom.
Set to perform: Diamond Head Theatre’s Shooting Stars, Moments Unforgettable Dance Academy and the Hawaii Youth Symphony.
A sit-down dinner, live and silent auctions also are on tap; those attending should don ‘60s garb like mini-skirts and bell-bottoms.
Individual tickets are $200; corporate seating ranges from $2,000 to $10,00.
Information: 695-4558.

Ride: A kids-free offer on Atlantis subs

A Keiki May Day special, enabling kids under 12 to ride free with a paying adult, makes the Atlantis Submarine marine tour attractive this weekend (May 1 to 3). The deal applies to Atlantis tours in Waikiki, Lahaina, and Kona, as well as the Atlantis Navatek sunset dinner cruises.
The sub tours bring spectators to depths of up to 125 feet, in the world of fish, sea turtles stingrays, sharks and a rare humpback whale.
Children must be 36-inches tall to participate and all guests must be able to navigate a nearly vertical 7-step ladder in and out of the submarine.
Atlantis Navatek Cruises departs Aloha Tower Marketplace each afternoon at 5:15 p.m.
Details: www.atlantissubmarines.com or 800-548-6262.

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Watching the parade passing by...

April 25th, 2009
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Hawai’i’s theater and dance community said aloha to one of its own yesterday — and a fond, fun and festive goodbye it was for Jim Hutchison — at Diamond Head Theatre.
Theater people do it best — share songs, share stories, share memories.
You could have charged admission for the Celebration of Life adieu for Hutchison, who died April 16 at age 75 of bladder cancer.
Little did most of us know that he kept a lively, hilarious and touching journal, from his four decades of dancing, directing and, excerpts from which were read by Kirk Matthews, who emceed the celebration. Oh, what an imprint Hutch left, on and off stage.
Ex-wife Wisa D’Orso, who performed a three-song medley complete with a white boa (really, when hasn’t she had a feathery companion?), was a sensation, singing and prancing — and oh, how we miss that smoky voice of hers! — and targeting some of the lyrics (especially “Goody, Goody”) to a director’s chair bedecked with lei and holding Hutch’s remains. Yep, those watching were chortling with delight.
Shari Lynn (“Before the Parade Passes By,” from “Hello, Dolly”; an earlier entry mistakenly attributed the tune to "Funny Girl," since corrected) and Dennis Proulx (“Trouble,” from “The Music Man”) personalized their numbers with reflection about their mentors with earnest charm and depicting the spontaneous honesty of Hutch.
After Shari closed her first-ever show on the DHT stage, she asked director Hutch what if she never gets another role? His comment: “Life goes on.” Proulx, who was sweaty at his “Music Man” audition, was showering at the theater when Hutch pulled the curtain to inform him he’d landed the Professor Harold Hill part.
Cathy Foy-Mahi reprised “I’ll Remember You,” the Don Ho hit, which, she said, Hutch had asked her to perform at his late friend Steve Harmon, beachside at Lanikai, so she did it for her buddy, too.
And Zenia Zambrano, who revived “Crazy” from her portrayal — twice — of singer Patsy Cline, fit the bill for Hutch’s cravings for country music ... when he was not listening to pop or the classics or show tunes.
Kurt and Tita, children of Hutch and D’Orso, also took the stage, demonstrating that they have show biz in their blood.
There was drama and comedy — Roslyn was to sing “The Party’s Over,” but couldn’t because of a bad cold; but throaty voice notwithstanding, she spoke with candor and warmth; Hutch’s good pal Glenn Cannon shared vignettes about their love, and bickerings, about football; Matthews, reading from Hutch’s journal about his Broadway experience of getting more chuckles than anyone else in Broadway's “Pajama Game,” because Hutch performed with his fly open; and Frank DeLima, in Cardinal Vermicelli regalia, gave a blessing and uncorked his gag with a Catholic punchline.
Missing: Terence Knapp, another of Hutch's longtime allies. So what happened? “I am heartbroken,” Knapp told me. He didn't know he was top of the program; he regrettably missed sharing his song and memoirs due to complications too long to discuss here, but he said he "hopes Jim understands and forgives." But Knapp made it to DHT in time to relay his sorrow to Kurt Hutchison.
Who could have asked for a better send-off? Hutch must be in heaven still laughing with joy, cherishing the parade of talented pals.

The dream that rocked the world

April 23rd, 2009
By



Susan Boyle’s meteoric rise — from obscurity to media darling in the past two weeks —has taught us valuable lessons about her mantra and ourselves.
Like:
• Don’t judge a book by its cover.
• Don’t under-value the power of a reality show.
• Media — in this case, that formidable YouTube clip, on which Boyle sings “I Dreamed a Dream” with remarkable intensity — play a big part in getting a name, a face, a thing out there.
Boyle, the unemployed, spinster 47-year-old nobody from Blackburn, Scotland, startled the jaded judges and the cynical audience on the British reality show, “Britain’s Got Talent.” With her scruffy demeanor housed an unexpected surprise.
She sang the poignant, difficult-to-pull-off ballad from “Les Miserables,” mostly to fulfill a dream she harbored with her late mother — to get a chance to be heard ... and immediately became a media sensation.
Now, she’s a somebody, the ugly ducking who doesn’t yearn to be a swan, just hungry for a chance to be seen and heard. And boy, she succeeded — with 60-million-plus YouTube hits, tons of chatter on Twitter, unrelenting exposure on mainstream TV talk, entertainment and news shows, and, yes an obvious newbie on the Wikipedia radar.
She was the anti-star. Frumpy clothing, disheveled hairdo, a look and form not usually fodder magazine covers.
A panel of judges — king-of-insults Simon Cowell, Amanda Holden and Piers Morgan — seemed ready to dismiss her, as did an eye-rolling audience anticipating the worst.
A William Hung she was not. But Boyle was that unpolished diamond in the rough, radiating with genuine vocal fireworks. Midway through the song, she became that phenom; folks in the audience were cheering, giving her a standing ovation.
It was a moment that echoed familiar pangs for
Loretta Ables Sayre, the Filipino singer-actress now starring as Bloody Mary in Lincoln Center’s “South Pacific,” who hadn’t seen the Boyle clip, but watched after we provided a link.
Her response, via e-mail: “Boy, I can really say I know how she feels. It brought back a flood of memories for me. When they (the judges) all gave her yes’s and she did a happy dance, it was exactly the same way I felt when they gave me my job after my call back with all of the R&H org (Rodgers & Hammerstein) and families there. Chicken skin!!!”
Ables Sayre is a plus-sized Filipina with a voice to match; while no one poked fun at her (the role required her body form), she had to prove herself to bring her Island presence to the national stage.
Boyle put her quaint village on the map, too, with news and talk shows sending crews to scope out her past and her haunts.
Was it solely her talent that made folks do a quick turn-around, from snickering to cheering; was it the economic climate of a gloom and heartache that fueled and spiral her connection with everyone; was it the bright light we needed to off set the stress of our daily lives?
And win, lose or draw, should Boyle be tampered with? Like makeover, with a new ‘do, new duds, a chin and body tuck?
Singer Jimmy Borges says uh-uh. No. “If I were presenting her, I would bring her ‘out’ exactly like the world saw her on YouTube. That’s a major part of the dynamic right now. If she sustains her popularity in future appearances, then a slowly-evolving makeover should be OK. Her singing is extraordinary for a ‘villager’…and that is the appeal…the transformation of Unappealing Duckling to Swan by way of a beautiful voice. It’s a great story that everyone aspires to or understands. She fulfilled Everyman’s Dream.”
Now Oprah wants Boyle. A CD may be calling. A new breed of cynics think Boyle is a plant, a fraud. At best, she’s earned her 15 minutes of fame.

On the Web:

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